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Research

The COASTAL Project - Threat 2: Predator loss

More than 90% of all top marine predators have disappeared from the oceans.—Myers et al. 2007; MacKenzie et al. 2009

“It appears that ecosystems such as Caribbean coral reefs need sharks to ensure the stability of the entire system.”–Enric Sala, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

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The COASTAL Project - Threat 1: Overfishing

One in five people on this planet depends on fish as the primary source of protein.—Food and Agriculture Organization

"We are in the situation where 40 years down the line we, effectively, are out of fish."—Pavan Sukhdev, UN Environment Programme

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The COASTAL Project - Threats

The oceans are in trouble. We are at a crossroads in history, and the actions we take – or fail to take – in the next decade will decisively impact the future of our seas and of our planet.

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Is the Current Climate Change Unusual?

...Compared to Earlier Changes in Earth’s History?

Some aspects of current climate change are not unusual, but others are. Carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere are the highest they have been for an estimated half a million years, and have risen at an exceptionally high rate. Average global temperatures are the highest they have been for at least 500 years, probably even a millennium. Another unusual feature of current climate change is that it is caused by human activities, whereas past climatic changes where due to natural causes.

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